Class and the Color Line: Interracial Class Coalition in the Knights of Labor and the Populist Movement by Joseph Gerteis

Page Updated:
Book Views: 8

Author
Joseph Gerteis
Publisher
Duke University Press
Date of release
Pages
0
ISBN
9781283023313
Binding
ebook
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
4
52

Advertising

Get eBOOK
Class and the Color Line: Interracial Class Coalition in the Knights of Labor and the Populist Movement

Find and Download Book

Click one of share button to proceed download:
Choose server for download:
Download
Get It!
File size:14 mb
Estimated time:2 min
If not downloading or you getting an error:
  • Try another server.
  • Try to reload page — press F5 on keyboard.
  • Clear browser cache.
  • Clear browser cookies.
  • Try other browser.
  • If you still getting an error — please contact us and we will fix this error ASAP.
Sorry for inconvenience!
For authors or copyright holders
Amazon Affiliate

Go to Removal form

Leave a comment

Book review

A lauded contribution to historical sociology, Class and the Color Line is an analysis of social-movement organizing across racial lines in the American South during the 1880s and the 1890s. The Knights of Labor and the Populists were the largest and most influential movements of their day, as well as the first to undertake large-scale organizing in the former Confederate states, where they attempted to recruit African Americans as fellow workers and voters.

While scholars have long debated whether the Knights and the Populists were genuine in their efforts to cross the color line, Joseph Gerteis shifts attention from that question to those of how, where, and when the movements’ organizers drew racial boundaries. Arguing that the movements were simultaneously racially inclusive and exclusive, Gerteis explores the connections between race and the movements’ economic and political interests in their cultural claims and in the dynamics of local organizing.

Interpreting data from the central journals of the Knights of Labor and the two major Populist organizations, the Farmers’ Alliance and the People’s Party, Gerteis explains how the movements made sense of the tangled connections between race, class, and republican citizenship. He considers how these collective narratives motivated action in specific contexts: in Richmond and Atlanta in the case of the Knights of Labor, and in Virginia and Georgia in that of the Populists. Gerteis demonstrates that the movements’ collective narratives galvanized interracial organizing to varying degrees in different settings. At the same time, he illuminates the ways that interracial organizing was enabled or constrained by local material, political, and social conditions.


Readers reviews